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Klondike Campground, Sunday 29 August

As I have previously mentioned, The Milepost has been "the Bible" for trekking (driving) to Alaska since 1949. Marshall tracked it down last spring and, while we both studied erratically in the interim, it has been devotedly referenced daily (and multiple times at that), since the trip began.

                  So we pull into the Klondike campground in Y.T. (Yukon Territory) about 12 miles out of Dawson City on the 29th. Of course, it is drizzling. I go to do the self-registration, and Marshall takes a stroll. When we both meet at the van, he pulls out our copy and says "Look at this - this is the car and tear-drop trailer that is in this ad for the Continental Divide campground that we stayed at last night. It is parked around the corner."

Turns out, it was Judy Nadon, Advertising Representative for The Milepost. Marshall had said to her: "I know who you are," they chatted, and then he returned to our site - and she graciously showed up with some dry wood (remember, it has been drizzling for days) to share with us. 

              We headed over to her site with a couple of beers, and spent a pleasant couple of hours sitting around her campsite, noshing on crackers, goat cheese and salami, and generally fixing the world. I asked to take her photo, and add her to the blog.




The next morning, Marshall and I skedaddled early, as our custom, so we didn't have a chance to say (yet another) good-bye.


                                                             When we got to Anchorage on September 2, we decided (on impulse) to go by the offices of The Milepost, and try and get a photo with Kris Valencia, the editor. Alas, it was 4:55, and she was gone for the day. We thought we might try and call in the morning; however, we stayed at a campground by Bird Creek, a number of miles down the Turnagain Arm, and the next morning decided it was too much of a hassle.


So, we settled for the photo I took at their corporate offices the previous afternoon.




Maybe they'll talk to us someday.





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