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sour toe cocktail




Well, one of the interesting side effects of doing this blog is all the feedback that I get from people.

My friend Ilona (http://www.openviewphotography.com/), who has been up to Alaska, sent along this link to an amusing story and place that she has visited: www.donreddick.com/tr_27.html The story of the sourtoe cocktail is something you won't want to miss.

Blogging. The word - "blog" - sounds like someone is about to be sick. The experience is like writing a diary, with someone looking over your shoulder. Luckily, I've done very little in either regard (writing a diary, or having someone look over my shoulder while I'm writing).
So this whole wrinkle ("blogging") on the trip to Alaska should prove to add another interesting dimension.

Self-portrait with the late Steven Stearman, the image for our first "Opening Night of the Opera" party invitation (he played in the orchestra and we did it annually for several years until he became too ill), in front of Pike's Peak, Colorado Springs, 1976.

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